6.23.2010

Preserving June Sour Cherries - Dry Freezing



Sour, tart or pie whatever you call these cherries they are a little too acidic eat straight from the tree, but they make delicious pies, jam, preserves or cobblers.  Jeff and I went out and picked a couple pounds this weekend.  The color is almost this florescent red.  I considered toning down the color in PhotoShop, but decided I might as well let it shine (or perhaps glow is a better word).  Also I dropped my camera and it is now held together with masking tape.  The autofocus was never great, but now it's painful.  Might be time for a new camera.  Any recommendations?
 

Back to the cherries...

How to Preserve Cherries in the Freezer: 

Basically all we did was pick the sour cherries, wash them, pit them with a parring knife and toss them with a bit of lemon juice (to preserve that electric color) and then put them into jars and froze them.  I ran out of jars so we did measure them into (reusable) freezer bags in four cup increments.  Four cups is how many are generally called for in pies. 

Most of these cherries are destine to become dessert or possibly pancake topping.  I'm thinking cherry pie will be a delicious treat for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Right now I've only got enough for four pies maximum.  Perhaps I'll get more next week. 

15 comments:

  1. Hi Foy! Your photos look lovely. Would like to see a photo of the cherries in their freezer jars, though. If freezing cherries is just that easy, I think I'll do it--as soon as I can get my hands on some reasonably priced organic cherries!

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  2. Practical and useful post again, Foy! I want to see what you guys do with them whenever you pull them out of the freezer...

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  3. oh! so simple Thanks for sharing.

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  4. I LOVE cherries! I've always wanted to try preserving them! Snaps for the awesome pics :)

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  5. I'm jealous that you were able to go pick those yourself! The best I can do is pick them out of the bin at the grocery store. Thanks for the freezing advice too. That's wonderful.

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  6. what a useful post! do you think the same method (minus pitting) would work for blueberries? i'm always astounded at how expensive blueberries become in september here. great post!

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  7. these are lovely! you have so many great berries to pick near you. sorry to hear about your camera. :( i have a Canon Rebel XS and love the entry features. it allows you to customize what you're doing (if you know what you're doing...i'm still learning...) and has several great auto features. if you're not an amateur like me though, you would probably want to upgrade to something more. good luck! :)

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  8. you can also make a cherry bitters with them if you've got extra (soak cherries less pits and stems in high alk white liquor. use 150 proof or higher if you can find it. remove cherries, add other botanicals, soak. strain. dilute to 60-80 proof 40% abv)

    fwiw I use my cell phone for a camera. rez is high enough, partiuclarly for online shots. not as satisfying but always with me...

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  9. Okay I like the idea of soaking them in alcohol.

    We're going to hopefully get some cherries this weekend. They're very early. Can't wait to get some frozen.

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  10. Thanks for this- I'm determined not to let the birds have my cherries again this year!

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  11. If you plan on picking significant quantities of cherries, I highly recommend getting a cherry pitter. I rarely bother with kitchen tools that only have a single purpose, but this is an exception; I picked 16 pounds of cherries the other day and pitted all of them that evening to prepare them for freezing. The pitter made the job much, much easier and kept the cherries intact.

    As for freezing blueberries (or raspberries, strawberries, etc.), my preferred method of freezing is to wash them, dry on paper towels and lay them out on a cookie sheet in a single layer. Pop them into the freezer, freeze solid and pour into zippered bags. This way, you can pour out as much as you need for a recipe without any waste. Unlike cherries, no lemon juice is necessary.

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  12. Love cherries...Great post:)

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  13. This was a timely post for me. Our berry crops are all late this year, but I suspect everything is going to come in at the same time. Yikes! This is my first visit to your blog but based on your recipes alone I'll be back often I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings...Mary

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  14. We have sour cherry trees too. Isn't that pitting part just so much fun? I spent the better part of 2 or 3 evenings doing that. We had a good crop this year. I use needle nose pliers to remove the pits - it works like a charm. Looking forward to your upcoming cherry recipes!

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  15. I picked a bunch and decided to brandy some. The rest will be frozen for scones. Always nice to preserve summer's bounty!

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